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Security on the Wire

Keeping Data on a Short Leash to Avoid Breaches

/ by Bill Alderson posted in data breach, data limits

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How to Avoid the 'Mousetrap Syndrome' of Network Security

/ by Jim Rounsville posted in network security, data limits, hop value, data breach

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How do we protect our data?

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[VIDEO] Everything You Always Wanted to Know About HOP Counts in Networking

/ by Bill Alderson posted in data breach

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Even some experienced security professionals don't always know the ins and outs of hop counts in networking. Because whether you're trying to figure out the traceroute number of hops or simply want a hop count example to give you clarity, it's important, as a network security professional, you see the 10,000-foot, big-picture level, before you dig into the trenches of things like hopcount in rip and network hops command.

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"It’s Not You; It’s Me": Network Protection From the Inside-Out

/ by Ben Haley posted in data limits, data breach, hop value

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Is Your Internet Browser Making You Vulnerable to a Hack?

/ by Ben Haley posted in data breach, firewall security

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Do you or others in your organization use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox browser extensions?

Many of us do. Often they have incredibly-useful features, such as ad-blocking, advanced searching, reducing page-load times, and much more.

But did you ever wonder if they could be used like a Trojan horse, presenting a friendly and helpful exterior while stealing your private information in the background?

Over 500,000 Chrome users just found out the hard way that this is indeed possible.

In mid-January 2018, the US-based cyber-security firm, ICEBERG, reported that four seemingly-harmless Google Chrome browser extensions had malicious code embedded within their designs to allow for stealing of private data.

Fortunately for these half-million users, it seems the nefarious code was only used to visit web ads in the background, something known as “click fraud.” These users were using the offending extensions and benefiting from the helpful features that the extensions offered, unaware their systems were being hijacked to help commit fraudulent activity. (Click fraud is often used for SEO manipulation and to steal money from advertisers through an ecosystem of fraudulent sites and click agents.)

So how does this relate to network security?

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How to Keep Your Server Safe (and Your To-Do List Manageable)

/ by Bill Alderson posted in hop value, data limits, data breach, server security, server security measures

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Takeaways:

  • A “Crown Jewel” server is defined as one storing high-value data.
  • Nearly every large organization has one or more of these servers.
  • The word “catastrophic” is grossly insufficient to describe a possible compromise. 
  • Building the "biggest castle" around your server may not be the answer.

Executives worry about their “Crown Jewel Server,” and for good reason. They are often packed with industry secrets, financial data, private client information, and other highly private information…and usually they are unnecessarily unsecure

And they require a healthy amount of time, energy (and money) to safeguard—depriving you  of the chance to direct your resources elsewhere.

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[VIDEO] Do You Know Where Your Data is Right Now?

/ by Bill Alderson posted in data breach

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The most effective network security solution isn't about building the most impregnable firewall. It's about limiting the distance your data can travel after it passes the firewall. 

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What Could Have Stopped the Most Recent Data Breach?

/ by Bill Alderson posted in recent data breach, data breach

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Takeaways:

• Prevention is more effective than cure when it comes to network security.

• Security obviation stops hackers at the source 

• A HOP value limits the amounts of hops that a server takes.

It’s a question every consumer and information professional asks themselves: what could have been done to stop the most recent data breach? Just throw a phrase such as “recent data breaches 2017” (or 18…or 19) into Google and you’ll see a continually-evolving list of data breaches affecting some of the biggest brands (and organizations) in the world.

…not to mention a treasure trove of second-guessing and hand-wringing about what could have been done, and what can be done about data breaches in the future!

As with any firewall security issue — and with most things in life — prevention is far more effective than any network security cure. In this article, we’ll discuss a most-powerful remedy for safeguarding your organization’s most precious information assets, and how it could have been used in the most recent data breach.

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