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Security on the Wire

Ben Haley

Ben Haley is the senior vice president of Engineering and co-founder of HOPZERO. During his over 30 years’ experience in software engineering, Ben has led network and application efforts for high performance, reliability, and security programs at multiple firms. As founding development director for NetQoS/CA Technologies, Ben led all development work and formed a research team to review performance and security anomalies. Most recently, he served as a lead architect for several key projects at MaxPoint (now Valassis), a leading digital marketing technology company.
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Recent Posts

What's on the Inside Can Be as Dangerous as What's on the Outside

/ by Ben Haley posted in network security

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What the IPSec Hack Can Teach Us About One-Layer Cyber Protection

/ by Ben Haley posted in cyber protection, cyber defense

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Think one-layer cyber protection is enough to handle whatever threat comes your organization's way? Think again.

Even the most comprehensive cyber defense system can still be vulnerable when dependent on a single layer of security.

Don't believe me?

This month researchers at Opole University, and the Institute for IT Security, demonstrated a weakness in certain implementations of IPSec.

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Are Half of All U.K. Manufacturers the Victims of Cyber-Crime?

/ by Ben Haley posted in network security

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Last week we participated at the RSA Conference in San Francisco. What an incredible conference!

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What the GDPR Means for the Future of Network Security

/ by Ben Haley posted in network security, gdpr

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Today I was looking at the agenda for RSA, this nation's biggest security conference. Not surprising, there are numerous sessions on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a sweeping act aimed at protecting private information for European Union (EU) residents.

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Is Proximity-Based Security Our Last Line of (Cyber) Defense?

/ by Ben Haley posted in network security

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2017 was a record year for many reasons. Amazing records were broken: we saw more green energy produced around the world and more capital invested in tech startups than ever before.

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"It’s Not You; It’s Me": Network Protection From the Inside-Out

/ by Ben Haley posted in data limits, data breach, hop value

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Why "Less is More" When It Comes to Network Security

/ by Ben Haley posted in network security, hop value, internet security firewall, firewall security

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Last week, Dark Reading published an analysis of 2017’s data breaches, and the results were quite bleak. 

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Is Your Internet Browser Making You Vulnerable to a Hack?

/ by Ben Haley posted in data breach, firewall security

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Do you or others in your organization use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox browser extensions?

Many of us do. Often they have incredibly-useful features, such as ad-blocking, advanced searching, reducing page-load times, and much more.

But did you ever wonder if they could be used like a Trojan horse, presenting a friendly and helpful exterior while stealing your private information in the background?

Over 500,000 Chrome users just found out the hard way that this is indeed possible.

In mid-January 2018, the US-based cyber-security firm, ICEBERG, reported that four seemingly-harmless Google Chrome browser extensions had malicious code embedded within their designs to allow for stealing of private data.

Fortunately for these half-million users, it seems the nefarious code was only used to visit web ads in the background, something known as “click fraud.” These users were using the offending extensions and benefiting from the helpful features that the extensions offered, unaware their systems were being hijacked to help commit fraudulent activity. (Click fraud is often used for SEO manipulation and to steal money from advertisers through an ecosystem of fraudulent sites and click agents.)

So how does this relate to network security?

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